Secretary Perdue Statement on Japan Agreement

(Washington, D.C. August 25, 2019) - U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement regarding the new trade agreement between the United States and Japan:

"Japan is a significant market for United States agriculture exports, making today a good day for American agriculture. By removing existing barriers for our products, we will be able to sell more to the Japanese markets. At the same time we will be able to close gaps to better allow us to compete on a level playing field with our competitors. I thank President Trump and Ambassador Lighthizer for their constant support of America's farmers and ranchers and their hard work negotiating better trade deals around the globe."

USDA Details Trade Damage Estimate Calculations

(Washington, D.C., August 23, 2019) - U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Office of the Chief Economist has published a detailed accounting of how estimated damage from trade disruptions was calculated for its support package for farmers announced on July 25, 2019. USDA's Office of the Chief Economist developed an estimate of gross trade damages for commodities with assessed retaliatory tariffs by China, India, the European Union, and Turkey to set commodity payment rates and purchase levels. USDA employed the same approach often used in adjudicating World Trade Organization trade dispute cases. "Just as we did before, we want to be transparent about this process and how our economists arrived at the numbers they did. Our farmers and ranchers work hard to feed the United States and the world, and they need to know USDA was thorough, methodical, and as accurate as possible in making these estimates.We listened to feedback from farmers on last year's programs and incorporated many of those suggestions into today's programs. While no formula can be perfect in addressing concerns from all commodities, we did everything we could to accommodate everyone," Secretary Perdue said.

These farmworkers were forced to labor on empty stomachs

During an incident in Kennett, Missouri, in summer 2018, H-2A workers labored through high temperatures while denied breakfast and with little access to water. Their legal status was supposed to protect them.

#AgAlerts: A surprise in a gene-edited cow; EPA denies glyphosate warning on product labels; greenhouse gas emissions from feedlots vs. grass-fed cows

“The egg business has undergone massive changes in the last 45 years. Once predominantly represented by such small family farms, it began to shift heavily toward industrialization and more vertically integrated systems, according to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center (AGMRC). Where once a flock of 400 laying hens was the norm, industrial flocks today can top 5 million hens.”

Opinion: Big ag searching for constitutional-proof ag gag law

Spearheaded by big ag lobbyists and enabled by big-ag friendly state legislatures, numerous laws have made it illegal to use deception to secretly videotape treatment of animals at private livestock and meatpacking facilities.

Opinion: Tyson sees the future … and it ain’t only about livestock

The question is: Will the Impossible Burger (and other
competitors eventual entries including Beyond Meat, Memphis Meat and Cargill)
be a craze, or is this the future?

The nation's top meat producer Tyson Foods has gazed into
the crystal ball and thinks it’s coming up meat substitutes.